Education stops bullying: Word in the Streets

Heed Dolly Everett’s words ‘speak even if your voice shakes’. If you know someone who needs help, call, or encourage them to call help through LifeLine 131 114.

Heed Dolly Everett’s words ‘speak even if your voice shakes’. If you know someone who needs help, call, or encourage them to call help through LifeLine 131 114.

Bullying is an insidious cowardly act, especially when that bullying leads to someone taking their own life.

Unfortunately, not many have not been affected by loss of family, friends or community members. A young 14-year-old, Amy ‘Dolly’ Everett was the young face of Akubra who suffered so severely from continual cyber bullying she took her own life.

Her loss devastated her family, but they realised elsewhere another family (or families) is dealing with the knowledge their child was involved in the bullying that contributed to Amy’s death.

Amy’s family put this message on Facebook, “If, by some chance, the people who thought this was a joke and made themselves feel superior by the constant bullying and harassment see this post, please come to our service and witness the complete devastation you have created.”

Bullies, as a result of their actions can be ‘bullied’ too. We are all responsible for our actions and I certainly wouldn’t like to think my actions resulted in someone’s death.

Bullying, unfortunately, will always be with us in our schools, workplace or society. Education as to how to cope with bullying and the devastating affects it can have is a step forward. ‘Dolly’s Dream Foundation” is that bullying will be no more, and in Amy’s last poignant images she included these words, “Speak even if your voice shakes.”

We all have a responsibility, so if you know someone who needs help, call, or encourage them to call help through LifeLine 131 114, Kids Help 1800 551 800, Mensline Australia 1300 789 978, Headspace 1800 650 890 or Beyond Blue 1300 224 636. How good would it feel if your caring saved a life.

                    WITS

As we approach Australia Day Friday January 26, the activists come out of the woodwork trying to convince us this date 26/1 is very inappropriate.

Two Australians of Aboriginal descent had dialogue on Today last week regarding the date of Australia Day. One was adamant it stays, calmly saying, “This is where we are, let’s move on.” The other was almost hostile in his views with two ridiculous dates suggested being Federation on January 1 or the day the Marbo decision was handed down in June.

I have advocated that January 26, 1788 was the day Australia changed forever. Native people have been wronged, white settlers have suffered extreme hardship. But from this early beginning Australia has developed into a multicultural nation that is surely the envy of the world. We must continue to build this unity.

I was pleased to read a piece by Jacinta Price (Telegraph Jan 12). Jacinta is a very proud woman with strong Aboriginality in her veins, veins that also carry the blood of many nationalities.

Jacinta highlighted atrocities suffered by Aboriginal people, but pointed out they are forgiving race. Almost as I have said, Jacinta said, ”We celebrate on January 26 because it marks the beginning of what we now call Australia. We cannot change this fact.’ The Aboriginal culture was never going to remain untouched  by the rest of the world.

Early settlers reached out their hands to embrace new comers bringing us today’s multicultural society. We must continue to build unity and harmony, resentment can only lead to conflict. We can find much in Jacinta Prices words:

“Yes, we have to learn more about our country’s history, not to create resentment, but to understand its complexities and what’s been achieved.”